© 2016 by RK

Today we are aware that Torco oil formulas will find there way into street applications so that the "MPZ" composition is adjusted to be friendlier toward emission requirements. For all out racing engine applications it's hard to beat the reaction films created when using "MFR". These chemistries are very tolerant of each other and we have not seen evidence of negative impact using the MFR in other Torco formulas where New Generation MPZ exists. The concentration of ingredients is extremely high in a bottle of MFR and because it always needs to be present in the oil to rebond after asperity collision of surface contacts, it can leave a visible deposit. The ratio of a 12oz bottle to 4 to 6quarts (or liters) equates to a treat of between aprox. 6 to 9%, that's very high. We know that some additional increase in concentration has been identified as some more power up to 12% but the engine has some visually more deposit identity to it. We have never seen or been told that evidence exists that these deposits effected filters, pumps or related flow requirements. We have customers using "MFR" in diesel applications and have not heard of any negative feed back that a problem occurred by its use. Over the many years of testing and customer feed back there is a known fact that even when the oil containing "MFR" is flushed out and replaced with non treated oil the horsepower increase that occurred will remain for some time until the zinc that is contained in the fresh oil has time to deposit its own High coefficient of friction layer increasing friction back to the original established friction.

 

The friction modifiers used for energy conserving requirements in modern engine oils work and behave differently than "MFR". They work by polar bonding fairly fragile polar films that under light load maintained speeds conducted under economy test conditions provide additional fluid film friction reduction in comparison to fluids not containing friction modifiers. These friction modifiers are not based on Phosphorus chemistry thereby complying with the needs of catalytic converter requirements. "MFR" doesn't seem to be effected by these types mainly I think, because it so drastically overwhelms them by the fact of so much concentration comparison. They virtually are greatly outnumbered.

MPZ

S$45.00 Regular Price
S$40.50Sale Price
  • Today we are aware that Torco oil formulas will find there way into street applications so that the "MPZ" composition is adjusted to be friendlier toward emission requirements. For all out racing engine applications it's hard to beat the reaction films created when using "MFR". These chemistries are very tolerant of each other and we have not seen evidence of negative impact using the MFR in other Torco formulas where New Generation MPZ exists. The concentration of ingredients is extremely high in a bottle of MFR and because it always needs to be present in the oil to rebond after asperity collision of surface contacts, it can leave a visible deposit. The ratio of a 12oz bottle to 4 to 6quarts (or liters) equates to a treat of between aprox. 6 to 9%, that's very high. We know that some additional increase in concentration has been identified as some more power up to 12% but the engine has some visually more deposit identity to it. We have never seen or been told that evidence exists that these deposits effected filters, pumps or related flow requirements. We have customers using "MFR" in diesel applications and have not heard of any negative feed back that a problem occurred by its use. Over the many years of testing and customer feed back there is a known fact that even when the oil containing "MFR" is flushed out and replaced with non treated oil the horsepower increase that occurred will remain for some time until the zinc that is contained in the fresh oil has time to deposit its own High coefficient of friction layer increasing friction back to the original established friction.

     

    The friction modifiers used for energy conserving requirements in modern engine oils work and behave differently than "MFR". They work by polar bonding fairly fragile polar films that under light load maintained speeds conducted under economy test conditions provide additional fluid film friction reduction in comparison to fluids not containing friction modifiers. These friction modifiers are not based on Phosphorus chemistry thereby complying with the needs of catalytic converter requirements. "MFR" doesn't seem to be effected by these types mainly I think, because it so drastically overwhelms them by the fact of so much concentration comparison. They virtually are greatly outnumbered.